May 23, 2017 greenhoper

The mental picture that most of us have of Antarctica is a frozen wasteland, white as far as the eye can see. But according to a new study that might not be the case in the future, as the continent is increasingly turning green in response to rising temperatures. Researchers from the University of Exeter have taken core samples from moss banks along the Antarctic Peninsula, and found that biological activity has ramped up massively over the last 50 years or so. The study follows up on the team’s previous work in 2013, which found that the steady warming of…

May 22, 2017 greenhoper 5Comment

If truth be told, climate and environmental issues barely featured in the referendum campaign at all. But, nearly a year after the Brexit vote, the United Kingdom’s climate and environment policies have become a source of both controversy and uncertainty. The U.K. has long seen itself as a global leader on climate change. The government has publically committed “to ensuring we become the first generation to leave the environment in a better state than we found it.” But on paper, nothing has changed. Even after the Brexit vote, the U.K. legislated carbon targets for 2030 that are more ambitious than…

April 24, 2017 greenhoper 3Comment

The environment is about to take center stage in American politics — a rare but potentially transformative moment in the brief, brown history of the Trump administration. On 22nd April and again next weekend, tens of thousands of people are expected to participate in March for Science, environment-oriented marches at the Washington Mall and around the country. First, they’ll protest President Donald Trump’s proposed science budget cuts and urge Trump to take science into account when making policy decisions on the environment and research. Next week, the goal is to raise awareness about global warming in the wake of Trump’s…

April 21, 2017 greenhoper

-“From Climate Change, Trump Policies, State Cuts” Connecticut’s environment showed little improvement in 2016 and is facing a risky future involving climate change, state funding shortages, and worrisome federal policy shifts, according to a watchdog agency’s latest report. The state’s Council on Environmental Quality’s annual report warned that Connecticut’s air, land and water quality doesn’t appear to be getting much better despite all the programs underway at the state and local levels. Lawmakers and the CEQ’s executive director, Karl Wagener, warned that staffing cutbacks at the state’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection agency have become so severe that the…

April 13, 2017 greenhoper 1Comment

Over the past couple of years, a steady stream of good news has appeared on the renewable energy front. The latest comes from a couple of Clean Energy Canada says renewable energy is unstoppable sources. Clean Energy Canada has released a new publication, “The Transition Takes Hold.” Bottom line: The transition from fossil fuels to renewable sources “now appears irreversible.” Meanwhile, the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) reports that renewable electricity-generating capacity of 161 gigawatts was added across the planet in 2016, bringing the capacity total of renewables above 2,000 gigawatts for the first time. The worldwide total electricity-generating capacity…

April 9, 2017 greenhoper 3Comment

Capacity addition from renewable energy sources surpassed conventional sources for the first time in financial year 2017 as India added 12.5 gigawatt (GW) of renewable energy capacity compared to 10.2 GW from conventional sources of fuel. “India added 12.5GW of renewable energy capacity during financial year 2017, surpassing capacity addition from conventional sources of fuel estimated at 10.2GW, in sync with global trends,” said a report by Elara Capital, which was released on Wednesday. Of the 10.2GW of capacity addition from conventional energy, 74% came from thermal, while the rest came from hydro and nuclear power projects. In financial year…

April 4, 2017 greenhoper

Climate change is already affecting the planet and society and will continue to do so for generations to come. The physical and chemical changes of human activities are being felt in natural ecosystems on land and at sea, on farms and ranches, and in cities and suburbs, but the changes are not happening uniformly. Differences in how regions are affected by varying degrees of warming, precipitation, and changes of animal and plant species are likely to get even more extreme as climate change continues. Some areas may actually get a bit cooler for a while! Similarly for rainfall, some parts…

March 29, 2017 greenhoper 4Comment

In the Arctic, hungry polar bears, unable to sustain themselves on the melting ice, are increasingly making their way inland to such towns as Noorvik, Alaska, and Churchill, Manitoba, where they sniff out garbage bins and scavenge for dinner. And in the Antarctic, wet baby penguin chicks shiver in the rain; warming temperatures mean less snow but more rain, which soaks them through, putting them at risk of freezing to death. These are the consequences of climate change, scientists say. Polar bears and penguins may live poles apart, with the great white mammals ruling the Arctic areas near the North…

March 23, 2017 greenhoper

Wayne Lording, a Sustainable Energy Farming Advisor will speak on the benefits associated with renewable energy on farms as part of the Regional Development Australia Murray ‘Energy Choices for the Murray Region’ and ‘Corowa District Land-care’ discussion on 24th March. Wayne will speak particularly with reference to the renewable energy available options for agriculture, including Geo-thermal energy – ground source heating system and cooling. Wayne is an environmentally friendly and Sustainable Energy Farming Advisor specializing in geothermal energy. With an electronic engineering background, this individual analyses farming businesses energy needs, suggesting ways in which our rural businesses can reduce ever-rising…

March 14, 2017 greenhoper 5Comment

As per the article “A World Turned Upside Down” from ‘The Economist’ which depicted a rather gloomy outlook for renewable energy. This was not because of switching political winds, like a might expect, or the oft-repeated fact that the sunlight does not shine at night. Instead, the experts pointed to two under the radar facts. First, building away the infrastructure required to reach critical mass for renewables will be tremendously expensive. Second, the economics around the receipt and delivery of electricity are changing dramatically, largely as a result of impact of renewables. As the two facts themselves are indisputable, the…